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A building referred to as a Buck House

Posted: 12 Aug 2018, 12:11
by Brendan Cotter
Hi,
I am conducting some early 19th century historical research and a property lease from that time refers to a building as a 'buck house', a buck house pump is also mentioned. Local fields were either pasture or arable. There was also some quarrying locally and two lime kilns and a culm store were nearby. Web searching for a clear definition of the term 'buck house' has been inconclusive. Might someone be able to help with a definition or explanation? Thank you for looking at this for me. Brendan

Re: A building referred to as a Buck House

Posted: 28 Aug 2018, 16:12
by webweaver
Brendan, it might be useful to say which part of the British Isles your Buck House references come from.
Webweaver

Re: A building referred to as a Buck House

Posted: 30 Aug 2018, 09:35
by Brendan Cotter
Thanks Webweaver - great name by the way. The location is Blackrock, Cork. There was a local farmer at the time called James Rockey (many Rockeys from the West Country). Rockey had a dairy somewhere in the immediate area - possibly a word connected to a dairy. The name 'Buck House' seems to be a common enough address and there are also Buckhouse families although I could not see a Buckhouse family forum to email. I may just send off a number of emails to the various web addresses and just see if anyone knows the origin of the name. Thanks again. Brendan

Re: A building referred to as a Buck House

Posted: 26 Sep 2018, 11:31
by Nutmeg
Have not come across this term in vernacular architecture in England - may I suggest contacting National Museum of Ireland https://www.museum.ie/Country-Life/Contact-Us

Alternative suggestion which you may already have thought of; are you sure it is not back house? This is a term commonly used in vernacular architecture.

Re: A building referred to as a Buck House

Posted: 22 Oct 2018, 09:47
by Brendan Cotter
Thanks Nutmeg for your response and apologies for tardy response. I had sort of given up. I will certainly contact the Museum of Country Life. I've been there a couple of times and it is a wonderful collection - that's a great suggestion. The 'Back' house typo is also worth considering but as I cannot yet get a clear fix on the exact property I cannot say for certain if a 'back house' existed. I'll keep at it and thanks again. Brendan

Re: A building referred to as a Buck House

Posted: 11 Jun 2019, 19:49
by Brendan Cotter
Just closing off this thread. A 'buck house' was where flax was scutched and dried. Thanks to those who tried to help out.

Re: A building referred to as a Buck House

Posted: 26 Jun 2019, 16:25
by webweaver
Hi Brendan
I am glad you have an answer to your question at last, and that you posted it on our forum.
Now we all know what a buck house was used for - it would be great if you could cite the source of this information.
Best wishes
WebWeaver